Only Child Likes Monopoly

5. Characteristics of the Only Child

The only child has the characteristics of both the Eldest Child and the Youngest Child. S/he is the only child of his/her parents, so they raise him/her very carefully and attentively. S/he receives only the best in everything. S/he acquires material things as much as the Eldest Child, and is protected as much as the Youngest Child. Having eliminated siblings, s/he can monopolize material possessions and protection. So, s/he is not good at sharing things with others. S/he tends to be laid back since things come to him/her without competition. S/he is inclined to perceive others as very greedy and competitive.

S/he does not have status and retainers, and does not have the same responsibilities as the Eldest Child. Since s/he is the only child surrounded by adults, s/he receives an enormous amount of attention. S/he takes it for granted that adults are there to serve him/her. S/he seeks absolute protection. In exchange for this protection, s/he has no freedom as his/her parents meddle with his/her business on all fronts. The image of the only child is that of the heir to the throne, living in a tower. Everybody guards him/her so carefully, lest something would happen to him/her. S/he has good relationships with elder people, but s/he cannot build good relationships with boys and girls his/her age. Yet, he allows him/her to focus on what s/he wants to do.

The only child is more timid than the Youngest Child. S/he tends to keep his/her parents’ attention by talking to them as much as s/he likes. More than the Eldest Child, s/he is secretary preoccupied with monetary assets. Because s/he wanted to monopolize his/her parents, s/he has no siblings, and that makes him/her more worried about the future as s/he grows. S/he cannot get rid of the fear that may happen when his/her parents die. Because of this fear and these worries, s/he has an inclination to accumulate wealth for his/her peace of mind. S/he likes savings money more than other children do. S/he has trouble understanding other people’s feelings because s/he did not have other siblings. S/he often feels as if s/he is an outsider.
Main characteristics:

A: S/he is not good at relationships. S/he has trouble understanding others and him/herself.
B: S/he is relaxed and less competitive. S/he is a pacifist.
C: S/he has a strong desire for money, but s/he is unaware of it because s/he desires it automatically and normally, and everything had come to him/her without competition or strong effort. S/he feels other people are more greedy than him/her.
D: S/he feels strong jealousy towards others when they have something that s/he wants.
E: S/he feels superior to people his/her age, because s/he grew up around people older than him/her.
F: S/he always carries a sense of loneliness.
G: S/he is very timid and does not want to venture out of his/her comfort zone. S/he has more fear as s/he grows older.
H: S/he wants people to do what s/he wants them to do. S/he is selfish.
I: S/he requires perfection from others.
J: S/he does not strive for improving him/herself and tends to maintain the status quo. S/he tends to procrastinate, but once s/he is determined, s/he does not hesitate.

People Have Wrong Definition of Love

Chapter 8: Change Definition of Love

Some people will have emotional difficulties when they try to broaden their perception. For those who hate the parents, it does not make sense when they hear that their parents loved them. Deeper investigation uncovers that they have resentment towards their parents who were different from their ideal image, saying; “my parents should have done that for me, but..” or “My parents were unusual. They didn’t act as other parents do..” Now they are adults, and they seem like they already have forgiven their parents, but those emotions still remain, even over something trivial. Those people have noticed many shortcomings in their parents.

Examples of the situation are:
1. My mother was cold-hearted, always paying attention to my elder brother and never to me.
2. My father was selfish and never fulfilled my needs. He never asked me what I wanted to buy and where I wanted to go.
3. My mom always took care of my younger sister, and she left me alone, saying “You are not a little child anymore.”
4. I was subject to abuse, so I was not same as other children. My parents were very immature.
5. I was always wondering why my family was deprived. My parents were always complaining about money and they didn’t buy anything for me.
6. My mother was dependent and obedient to my father. I didn’t want to turn out to be like her. I thought women were at a disadvantage. That’s why I never married.
7. I grew up in a loveless family because my parents divorced. I don’t know how to love, so nobody loves me.

You cannot recognize things that you take for granted. If you are a parent, you must know from experience what a demanding job parenting is. Parents spend most of their time child-rearing. Those who do not admit that their parents loved them do not comprehend this. They say, “I did not ask them to give birth. They just had me, so it’s their duty to raise me. However, simply taking care of me is not love.” They are asking their parents for something special, more than simply taking care of them. For those people, love means dependence and control. If they insist on this attitude, they will never have true love because the growing older naturally means less dependence on others.

If a woman has this dependency, she will have a fear of loving others. It is not because she did not have her parents’ love but she has become fearful thinking a lover will be dependent on her and control her just in the same way as she demanded to her mother and father. In her private life, she will have trouble getting married, and socially she will not enjoy working with subordinates because she believes other people are really dependent on her. As we have seen so far, the old, piled up resentments hinder growth and development, and they put limitations on you unknowingly. Thus, the misconception of the definition of love limits you in many ways.

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Misinterpretation Rooted From Limited Perspectives

Chapter 7: Broaden Perspectives and Eliminate Misinterpretation

How were your answers in the preparatory exercises? Most students answered something like, “I understood my mother over 99 percent but she understood me only 10 percent.”
The answers reveal that most of us feel that our mother’s perception on us was wrong and our viewpoint of our mothers was right. Is this true? No, in fact your mother definitely understood you much better than you did your mother. Do you agree? The more mature you are, the more you understand this and agree. The same goes for your workplace; the less experienced employees absolutely cannot understand the more experienced workers. However, you believed that as a child, you could judge your parents better than they judged you as well. This per se is an example of misinterpretation rooted from limited perspectives.

Your immature mind defined your parents before you were six years old. Thus, without truly understanding what your parents were actually doing, you have defined what your parents were. A broader perspective brings accurate views. For example, the whole view of an elephant drives you to understand accurately what an elephant is. But with a limited viewpoint, if you see only a leg of an elephant, you misinterpret that the foot is the entire elephant. You would believe that an elephant must be like a wall.

The same thing happened in your childhood. The perceptive of a child is centered on self. Child-you determined that whoever pampers you is a good person, and whoever restricts you is a bad person. Children would likely say;
“My mother is cold. She is always nice to my younger sister, not me.”
”My dad gets angry easily. He is scary. I don’t want to talk to him. I hate him.”

Fractal Psychological modification of Inner Child makes your perception of time wider and lets you get the whole picture of every object. You need to consider what the true meaning of fairness is, and who should have priority in a family. This consideration will help you get rid of your misinterpretation. And then, you can start to perceive a new world that you have missed so far.

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The Traits of Your Parents Are Those You Already Possess

Chapter 5: Features of Fractal Psychology in Modifying Inner Child

Inner Child Therapy in Fractal Psychology is to modify your mind that remains stunted, by healing, re-experiencing and re-interpreting the events that caused trauma. Conventional therapy to treat Inner Child helps one to forgive his/her parents who gave imprinting and caused traumas, and to correct a tendency inherited from his/her ancestors. However, this does not conform to the theory of Fractal Psychology which is based on TAW, saying “Thoughts create reality.” TAW stipulates that our thoughts precede our parents.

As we learned from chapter three, we cannot recognize traits like love, because we do not possess love in ourselves. Therefore, some traits you see in parents are those you already have in your mind. Since you do not want to see them in yourself, you project them to your parents instead. Unless you admit that those traits originally belong to you, you cannot change your situation on your own, and you will experience the same situation again. When you experience the same situation, you will say as usual, “This negative pattern has been imprinted on me by my parents, so I’m experiencing this situation.”

Let me illustrate the above point. You felt that your clothes got dirty when you hugged your parents. You thought that their clothes were soiled first and made a mess on yours. So you exclude your parents from your life. Next, you change clothes and embrace your lover. Your lover’s clothes get dirty as well. Whose clothes are dirty after all? It seems that it is your body that is soiled. You see, this is how conventional therapies work, forgiving your parents and others for something even though they were still guilty, without pointing out the true cause.

Here is an example: suppose that your father hit you when you were a child. You forgive him saying, “Oh, he was immature back then. I will forgive him.” It may heal you temporarily and give you a sense of superiority as you felt like you successfully changed yourself. Yet, the tendency to be aggressive to others actually belongs to you, not your father, so you cannot change your disposition despite removing your father from your world. Therefore, you continue to attack people to whom you feel superior, including your children. In those instances, you will make an excuse that the trauma made by your father in your childhood still affects you.

You might remember that repeated memories act like true facts, as we have already learned. These memories repeatedly imaged create another reality. As a result, you might see somebody aggressive around you. You really desire that nobody hurts you, but you are creating somebody who is worse than you, in order to hide your true disposition. Thus, the vicious cycle continues.

TAW methods do not need external villains when you heal yourself. You do not need to forgive somebody in a therapy. All you need to do in therapy is to admit firstly that your father is a projection of your own self. If your father hit you, it suggests that you have initially attacked him (affronted him, belittled him) before his attack. Remember, “Thinking and Taking Action Are the Same Thing.” The admission comes first, and then, you will discover that even now your inner voice is always affronting somebody subconsciously. These aggressive dispositions are the true causes to drive you to your present troubles. Let me emphasis again, the admission must be first. Then, you recognize that your hidden personality, not the trauma, causes your present problems.

In the preparatory worksheet, you listed things that in which you think you are not as bad as your parents. That list is exactly what you have in yourself.

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We Are Using Two Parts of Brain

Chapter 2: How Inner Child Perceives

Imagine that your male coworker told you (a woman) what happened over the weekend during the lunch break at work. He said, “Yesterday I took my daughter to the amusement park. She was so excited, but started whining when it was time to leave. She squatted and would not walk. So I had to raise my voice and finally tap her butt to make her stand up, and had to carry her along with heavy luggage because, you know, I had to come to work today. I was so exhausted.” You would sympathize with him, and would say, “That must have been tough. She spoiled your day off,” understanding your coworker’s disappointment. And you would add, “Well, you are very nice to your daughter. You do love her. My parents weren’t that nice. I remember that a long time ago my dad took me to the amusement park and that suddenly I got spanked even though I did not do anything.”

Let’s look at how the mind operates. When you listen to your coworker, you use you adult and mature mind, and make judgments with it. The adult mind allows you to see that he loves his daughter and spent his money and his day off taking her to an amusement park to make her happy. You also completely understood that the child spoiled all his kindness by whining and acting inconsiderately, and that she hurt her father deeply. However, when you recall and talk about your own similar experience from childhood, you apply the immature, child mind without noticing. It is revealed that you still have no idea how much you hurt your father’s feelings and disappointed him as a child.
As in the example, you will face some trouble because you still judge your parents with your immature, child mind. When you become an adult, the way you perceive your parents will transform to match how you perceive society, politicians, and the president of your work place. If you are dissatisfied with these people, your immature mind will automatically react to them. That makes you preoccupied with unhappy circumstances, and it will cause you problems at work. If you get angry with politicians or feel that society is not functioning well, or you dislike the president of your company, it means that you still have misconceptions and misunderstandings about your parents. You need to take a close look and reassess your parents with your mature, adult mind. When you have modified your mind, you will see your future circumstances changing gradually. That is because “your thoughts create your reality, 100%.”

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What Is Inner Child in Fractal Psychology?

Basic Lecture 2: What is Inner Child

Preparatory Worksheet

1. What kinds of problems would you experience when using a computer with an old operating system?

2. How old were your mother and father when you were born?

3. List situations or circumstances in your childhood when you felt being loved by your parents. Examples: When they hugged you; when they bought you a toy.

4. List things that irritate or anger you often in daily life, including really minor things.

5. Did you think that you had been better than your mother or father (or had not been as bad as your parents) in certain aspects? If any, list them.

a. Things better than your mother:
b. Things better than your father:

6. Answer the following questions.

A. Fill in the blanks in the following questions:
“Parents should do (      ) for children.”
“I wished that my parents would have (    ) for me. “

B. Visualize a childhood scene where your family is watching TV after dinner. Who has the control to choose the channels?

C. Imagine your parents and you (age 6) are at the toy store, and they about to buy a toy for you.
Who is choosing what to purchase? Your father, your mother, or yourself?

7. Answer the following questions. Do not give too much thought in answering. The maximum number is 100.
Q1) When you were in middle school, you were scolded by your mother. She said that you
were very self-centered. How much did you think she understood you?
(     )%
Q2) When you heard your mom saying the above, you thought that she was really short-tempered. How much do you think you understood her?                                                                          (       )%

8. What is your definition of “love?”
To love somebody is to (                        .)

9. Please refer to your answer(s) to the question 3 on page 21. How often did your parents do what you had wished that they would do? How many times? Occasionally?

10. What are the benefits or rewards, if any, if you get seriously sick or in an accident?

From Where Did His Sense of Guilt Come?

Case Study 3

Concealing One’s Sense of Guilt

Mr. K is troubled with his inability to express his feelings and emotions. His boss and coworkers think he lacks energy and vitality at work. He has tried to various therapies and was told that the cause of his trouble was a childhood memory of his father. His father always told Mr. K that he was a bad child. The therapies helped him with this memory, but he was not fully healed.

Eventually he received Fractal Psychological therapy. The sessions revealed that this memory was not a true cause of the problem. In the light of the TAW principle that thoughts create reality, it was interpreted that Mr. K initially had thought he was a bad child before his father said so. He examined the memory deeper to find out something different. As a child, Mr. K would steal merchandise from the store that his family ran while he was afraid of getting caught. There was one instance when he was caught and was scolded by his father, who told him that he was a bad boy. With this sense of guilt, he replayed this event over and over in his mind, which imprinted it as the fabricated memory that his father always saw him as a bad boy.

This tendency is not limited to his past. Mr. K still has a temptation to steal as an adult. He has never shoplifted nor stolen practically, but in his mind he always fights with the impulse. He carries the sense of guilt and that is what prevents him from articulating his feelings.

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